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hapticreaction:

Open to all, free to all, Haptic Reaction is a mobile event that focuses on the exchange of communication through personalized postcards. We will be biking across Minneapolis for this event!Times and locations are as follows:Nicollet Mall: 10-11amStone Arch Bridge: 11:30-12:30 pmGold Medal Park: 1-2pmDinkytown: 3-4pmThe main focus of the experience is to create a postcard that will be mailed to another participant of the event. Each person who chooses to take part must sign into a guest book with their address, including only their first name. A writing prompt is provided on the backs of every postcard; four different prompts that participants can choose to answer. People are free to choose what or how intimately they wish to respond to their chosen prompt. The provided postcards will also be imageless, which participants can design, however, inappropriate postcard designs or responses will be disqualified and a new image or response will be fabricated for the postcard before it is mailed, for the safety of the postcard recipient. At the end of the event the postcards will be collected and displayed on a website publication: hapticreaction.tumblr.com. The purpose of this event is to reenact the sense of the giving and receiving of physical letters. The event inverts the contemporary exchange of communication through instant and digital devices, and provides the opportunity to experience the anticipation of waiting for letters to be sent through the traditional post services. The excitement of sending and receiving a thoughtful handwritten letter has been traded for instantaneous and mechanical notes, impersonalized, and dehumanized.Haptic Reaction allows people to be open-minded and creative, to experience taking time out of our fast-paced society to sit down and write a letter to another person. The event replaces our communication from behind screens to the creation of a physical personalized message, thoughtfully and carefully crafted and mailed, and accentuating the specialness and individualization of giving and receiving letters.

hapticreaction:

Open to all, free to all, Haptic Reaction is a mobile event that focuses on the exchange of communication through personalized postcards. 

We will be biking across Minneapolis for this event!
Times and locations are as follows:

Nicollet Mall: 10-11am
Stone Arch Bridge: 11:30-12:30 pm
Gold Medal Park: 1-2pm
Dinkytown: 3-4pm

The main focus of the experience is to create a postcard that will be mailed to another participant of the event. Each person who chooses to take part must sign into a guest book with their address, including only their first name. A writing prompt is provided on the backs of every postcard; four different prompts that participants can choose to answer. People are free to choose what or how intimately they wish to respond to their chosen prompt. The provided postcards will also be imageless, which participants can design, however, inappropriate postcard designs or responses will be disqualified and a new image or response will be fabricated for the postcard before it is mailed, for the safety of the postcard recipient. At the end of the event the postcards will be collected and displayed on a website publication: hapticreaction.tumblr.com. 

The purpose of this event is to reenact the sense of the giving and receiving of physical letters. The event inverts the contemporary exchange of communication through instant and digital devices, and provides the opportunity to experience the anticipation of waiting for letters to be sent through the traditional post services. The excitement of sending and receiving a thoughtful handwritten letter has been traded for instantaneous and mechanical notes, impersonalized, and dehumanized.

Haptic Reaction allows people to be open-minded and creative, to experience taking time out of our fast-paced society to sit down and write a letter to another person. The event replaces our communication from behind screens to the creation of a physical personalized message, thoughtfully and carefully crafted and mailed, and accentuating the specialness and individualization of giving and receiving letters.

(via stuffaboutminneapolis)

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hermionejg:

willcub:

So many of you are too young to remember why Diana, Princess of Wales, was such a remarkable person.  She pissed off most of Buckingham Palace, was her own woman, and wasn’t afraid to get down out of the motorcade and be with the regular people.

She was a regular person, just with a title and fancy clothes.  

Among the first big “names” to visit, talk to, and even touch those dying of AIDS in English hospitals, Diana’s trademark was her ability to break down insurmountable barriers.

Such an amazing woman.

(Source: dianaspot)

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(Source: tmbgareok)

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whitehouse:

Don’t wait! It’s the last day to sign up for 2014 health coverage.
If you need insurance, go to HealthCare.gov now.
Already have coverage? Reblog this to make sure your followers are, too.

whitehouse:

Don’t wait! It’s the last day to sign up for 2014 health coverage.

If you need insurance, go to HealthCare.gov now.

Already have coverage? Reblog this to make sure your followers are, too.

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cablestotheace:

David Hockney with William S. Burroughs at the Naropa Institute, Boulder, c. July 1989 (Photo by Allen Ginsberg)

cablestotheace:

David Hockney with William S. Burroughs at the Naropa Institute, Boulder, c. July 1989 (Photo by Allen Ginsberg)

(via naropau)

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prairiehomecompanion:

stuffaboutminneapolis:

Forest in shape of Minnesota: Oaks hoax? Nope – genuine pine shrine
At first glance, it looks a bit fake, like a Photoshopped woodsy version of crop circles.
But Google Maps doesn’t lie. Tucked into the forests of Park Township in Lake of the Woods County is a 23-acre stand of jack pine trees in the shape of Minnesota.
Reddit users this week were buzzing about the image – and whether it could possibly be real – after someone posted an image of it. Who pulled this off – liquored-up lumberjacks? Aliens?
No, it was inventive DNR forestry veteran Bill Lockner – in the late 1980s, way before Google Maps.
A timber sale on the state-managed land was pending, so Lockner made it interesting. Without the benefit of GPS, Lockner surveyed out the Minnesota shape, using only rudimentary tools, a compass and hip chain, DNR spokeswoman Jennifer Teegarden told BringMeTheNews. 
Subsequently, the land around it has been logged off, and new trees have grown up in the Minnesota shape, Lake of the Woods County water and lands Director Josh Stromlund explained. The Minnesota-shaped stand – roughly 1,200 feet wide at the arrowhead and 1,350 feet tall – is well known by county residents, he said.
via Bring Me The News and Reddit

Somewhere a few hours north of Lake Wobegon…

prairiehomecompanion:

stuffaboutminneapolis:

Forest in shape of Minnesota: Oaks hoax? Nope – genuine pine shrine

At first glance, it looks a bit fake, like a Photoshopped woodsy version of crop circles.

But Google Maps doesn’t lie. Tucked into the forests of Park Township in Lake of the Woods County is a 23-acre stand of jack pine trees in the shape of Minnesota.

Reddit users this week were buzzing about the image – and whether it could possibly be real – after someone posted an image of it.
Who pulled this off – liquored-up lumberjacks? Aliens?

No, it was inventive DNR forestry veteran Bill Lockner – in the late 1980s, way before Google Maps.

A timber sale on the state-managed land was pending, so Lockner made it interesting. Without the benefit of GPS, Lockner surveyed out the Minnesota shape, using only rudimentary tools, a compass and hip chain, DNR spokeswoman Jennifer Teegarden told BringMeTheNews.

Subsequently, the land around it has been logged off, and new trees have grown up in the Minnesota shape, Lake of the Woods County water and lands Director Josh Stromlund explained. The Minnesota-shaped stand – roughly 1,200 feet wide at the arrowhead and 1,350 feet tall – is well known by county residents, he said.

via Bring Me The News and Reddit

Somewhere a few hours north of Lake Wobegon…

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"The only way out of the labyrinth of suffering is to forgive."

— John Green, Looking for Alaska (via observando)

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"

Olivia, my eldest daughter, caught measles when she was seven years old. As the illness took its usual course I can remember reading to her often in bed and not feeling particularly alarmed about it. Then one morning, when she was well on the road to recovery, I was sitting on her bed showing her how to fashion little animals out of coloured pipe-cleaners, and when it came to her turn to make one herself, I noticed that her fingers and her mind were not working together and she couldn’t do anything.

“Are you feeling all right?” I asked her.

“I feel all sleepy, ” she said.

In an hour, she was unconscious. In twelve hours she was dead.

The measles had turned into a terrible thing called measles encephalitis and there was nothing the doctors could do to save her.

That was twenty-four years ago in 1962, but even now, if a child with measles happens to develop the same deadly reaction from measles as Olivia did, there would still be nothing the doctors could do to help her.

On the other hand, there is today something that parents can do to make sure that this sort of tragedy does not happen to a child of theirs. They can insist that their child is immunised against measles. I was unable to do that for Olivia in 1962 because in those days a reliable measles vaccine had not been discovered. Today a good and safe vaccine is available to every family and all you have to do is to ask your doctor to administer it.

It is not yet generally accepted that measles can be a dangerous illness.

Believe me, it is. In my opinion parents who now refuse to have their children immunised are putting the lives of those children at risk.

In America, where measles immunisation is compulsory, measles like smallpox, has been virtually wiped out.

Here in Britain, because so many parents refuse, either out of obstinacy or ignorance or fear, to allow their children to be immunised, we still have a hundred thousand cases of measles every year.

Out of those, more than 10,000 will suffer side effects of one kind or another.

At least 10,000 will develop ear or chest infections.

About 20 will die.

LET THAT SINK IN.

Every year around 20 children will die in Britain from measles.

So what about the risks that your children will run from being immunised?

They are almost non-existent. Listen to this. In a district of around 300,000 people, there will be only one child every 250 years who will develop serious side effects from measles immunisation! That is about a million to one chance. I should think there would be more chance of your child choking to death on a chocolate bar than of becoming seriously ill from a measles immunisation.

So what on earth are you worrying about?

It really is almost a crime to allow your child to go unimmunised.

"

Roald Dahl, 1986

(via brain-confetti)

TEAM VACCINE

(via watchoutfordinosaurs)

NINETEEN EIGHTY SIX.

roald dahl was calling out the anti-vaccination movement as self indulgent bullshit //thirty god damn years ago//.

(via ultralaser)

Over 1,000 preventable deaths and 128,000 preventable illnesses since 2007 and counting

And this is only in recent history. I can’t imagine the numbers if we had data all the way back to 1986.

(via autistiel)

And thanks to anti-vaxxers, measles is back in the United States.

(via thebicker)

(via wilwheaton)

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"Who what am I? My answer: I am the sum total of everything that went before me, of all I have been seen done, of everything done-to-me. I am everyone everything whose being-in-the-world affected was affected by mine. I am anything that happens after I’ve gone which would not have happened if I had not come. Nor am I particularly exceptional in this matter; each “I”, everyone of the now-six-hundred-million-plus of us, contains a similar multitude. I repeat for the last time: to understand me, you’ll have to swallow a world."

— Salman Rushdie (via observando)

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(Source: letsgoforahike, via wilwheaton)

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hodgman:

Just you know, in a place. What more can I say? IT IS WATER.  (at LaGuardia Airport (LGA))

hodgman:

Just you know, in a place. What more can I say? IT IS WATER. (at LaGuardia Airport (LGA))

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slaughterhouse90210:

"Stick a shovel in the ground almost anywhere and some horrible thing or other will come to light."― Margaret Atwood, The Blind Assassin

slaughterhouse90210:

"Stick a shovel in the ground almost anywhere and some horrible thing or other will come to light."
― Margaret Atwood, The Blind Assassin

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obscurings:

Ice skating at Millennium Park, Chicago.

obscurings:

Ice skating at Millennium Park, Chicago.

(via soariant)

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awkwardsituationist:

awkwardsituationist:

carina nebula, about 8000 light years away, 50 light years long in this false colour image. bright star in second panel is about 100-150 times the mass of the sun.

for those watching the broadcast premiere of cosmos: a spacetime odyssey, it’s worth remembering that ten years ago neil degrasse tyson hosted “origins" for pbs nova. also worth watching: wonders of the universe and wonders of the solar system with brian cox; fabric of the cosmos with brian greene; into the universe with stephen hawking (narrated by bendict cumberbatch); the cosmos: a beginners guide, the six seasons of the history channel’s “the universe”; nat geo’s extreme universe, journey to the edge of the universe and how the universe works

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"Twas brillig and the slithy toves,
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.
‘Beware the Jabberwock, my son,
the jaws that bite and claws that scratch
Beware the jubjub bird
and shun the frumious bandersnatch.’"

— Lewis Carroll (via observando)